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Published as: Aerts, D., Broekaert, J. and Gabora, L., 1999, "Formal and Informal Representations of Science", Foundations of Science, 4, 1-2.
 

Summary: Published as: Aerts, D., Broekaert, J. and Gabora, L., 1999, "Formal and
Informal Representations of Science", Foundations of Science, 4, 1-2.
Editorial: Formal and Informal Representations of Science
Diederik Aerts, Jan Broekaert and Liane Gabora,
Center Leo Apostel, Brussels Free University,
Brussels, Belgium
diraerts@vub.ac.be, jbroekae@vub.ac.be and
lgabora@vub.ac.be
We are fortunate to present in this issue a number of high quality papers
on many diverse foundational issues in science. A paper by Paul Agutter
and Denys Wheatley discusses how the intentionality, or 'purposiveness',
of biological systems is what distinguishes them from other
physicochemical systems. Bruce Edmonds puts forth an exciting and
pragmatic compromise between reductionism and holism. A paper by
Francis Heylighen addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the
process of formalization. Formalization generally increases the
universality and clarity of an idea; however, by the time a result is
encountered by fellow scientists, it has usually been formalized to the
point that the circumstances through which it was discovered are
obscured, or fully erased.

  

Source: Aerts, Diederik - Leo Apostel Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

 

Collections: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources; Physics