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ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter Four: Transfer Function Approach CCCCCCCChhhhhhhhaaaaaaaapppppppptttttttteeeeeeeerrrrrrrr 44444444
 

Summary: ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter Four: Transfer Function Approach
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A. Bazoune
4444....1111 INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION
Transfer functions (TF)are frequently used to characterize the input-output
relationships or systems that can be described by Linear Time-Invariant (LTI)
differential equations.
Transfer Function (TF)Transfer Function (TF)Transfer Function (TF)Transfer Function (TF). The transfer function (TF) of
a LTI differential-equation system is defined as the ratio of the Laplace
transform (LT) of the output (response function) to the Laplace transform
(LT) of the input (driving function) under the assumption that all initial
conditions are zero.
Consider the LTI system defined by the differential equation
( )
1 1
0 1 1 0 1 1

  

Source: Al-Qahtani, Hussain M. - Mechanical Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

 

Collections: Engineering