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Interpreting evidence of dispersal by Haliotis midae juveniles seeded in the wild
 

Summary: Interpreting evidence of dispersal by Haliotis
midae juveniles seeded in the wild
S.W.P. de Waala,*, G.M. Brancha
, R. Navarrob
a
Department of Zoology, University of Cape Town, PO Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
b
Avian Demography Unit, University of Cape Town, PO Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
Received 19 September 2002; received in revised form 21 January 2003; accepted 24 January 2003
Abstract
Recovery rates of hatchery-raised juvenile abalone seeded in the wild are a result of both
survivorship, and dispersal in the time between seeding and sampling. Seeding experiments with
juvenile Haliotis midae were conducted at two localities in South Africa to determine recovery
rates, which were high at one of the sites (McDougall's Bay) and low at the other (Gouriqua). This
difference may reflect the influence of habitat suitability on survivorship, but cannot be interpreted
as such without a knowledge of dispersal rates because high dispersal may hinder detection of
surviving juvenile abalone. We hypothesized that significant active dispersal by the abalone took
place at Gouriqua, where they were seeded in a shallow habitat in which wave and surf activity had
a direct impact. Conversely, at McDougall's Bay, a wave-sheltered site, where the juvenile abalone
were seeded at slightly greater depth, there was little or no active dispersal by juvenile abalone. We

  

Source: Altwegg, Res - Avian Demography Unit, Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Cape Town

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology