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Extending the effects of spike-timing-dependent plasticity to behavioral timescales
 

Summary: Extending the effects of spike-timing-dependent
plasticity to behavioral timescales
Patrick J. Drew*
and L. F. Abbott
*Neurobiology Section, Division of Biology, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357; and Center of Neurobiology
and Behavior, Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Kolb Research Annex,
1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032-2695
Edited by Charles F. Stevens, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, and approved April 19, 2006 (received for review January 26, 2006)
Activity-dependent modification of synaptic strengths due to
spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is sensitive to correla-
tions between pre- and postsynaptic firing over timescales of tens
of milliseconds. Temporal associations typically encountered in
behavioral tasks involve times on the order of seconds. To relate
the learning of such temporal associations to STDP, we must
account for this large discrepancy in timescales. We show that the
gap between synaptic and behavioral timescales can be bridged if
the stimuli being associated generate sustained responses that
vary appropriately in time. Synapses between neurons that fire
this way can be modified by STDP in a manner that depends on the
temporal ordering of events separated by several seconds even

  

Source: Abbott, Laurence - Center for Neurobiology and Behavior & Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine