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Organization A paper usually has the following basic sections: Introduction of problem, previous work, proposal for new
 

Summary: Organization
A paper usually has the following basic sections: Introduction of problem, previous work, proposal for new
ideas, results, future work and conclusions.
1. State what needs to be done and how you will accomplish it.
2. State the goal for the research in the first paragraph. This is so important. If I started telling you
something without any introduction, you would have a hard time knowing how to listen to it: Is it a
joke? Do I have a question? Do I want your opinion? Am I going to ask you for money? If I precede the
story with, ``I was wondering what you thought of this idea for making money.'' or ``Would you be
willing to contribute to a good cause?'' you would listen differently - instead of wondering, ``Why is she
telling me this?''
Your reader never wants to wonder what you are trying to accomplish. You should make it very clear.
3. Help the reader understand where you are going and why they care. Often times the reader can't figure
out what you really intend to do as there is just a mass of facts in the paper. State your goal early in the
paper. Refer to it often. At the end, summarize what you have told us.
Tell us what you are going to tell us, tell us, then tell us what you have told us.
Think of it as writing a good novel. When an author writes a novel, he gives lots of clues as to how the
pieces of the story fit together. If he wrote the whole book and it ended up that the murderer was
someone never referred to in the story, it would be considered a poor plot. If the writer told you lots of
things that were not important, it would get boring. The writer sets the stage so you can see the end
coming.

  

Source: Allan, Vicki H. - Department of Computer Science, Utah State University

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences