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Neuron, Vol. 35, 773782, August 15, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press Gain Modulation from Background Synaptic Input
 

Summary: Neuron, Vol. 35, 773­782, August 15, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press
Gain Modulation from Background Synaptic Input
tex (Andersen and Mountcastle, 1983; Andersen et al.,Frances S. Chance,1,3
L.F. Abbott,2
1985), the effects of attention (McAdams and Maunsell,and Alex D. Reyes1
1999a; Treue and MartiŽnez-Trujillo, 1999), and as a pos-1
Center for Neural Science
sible basis for a variety of "nonclassical" receptive fieldNew York University
effects in primary visual cortex (Heeger, 1992). GainNew York, New York 10003
modulation has also been proposed as a mechanism for2
Volen Center for Complex Systems and
the neural computation of coordinate transformationsDepartment of Biology
relevant for tasks ranging from visually guided reachingBrandeis University
(Zipser and Andersen, 1988; Salinas and Abbott, 1995;Waltham, Massachusetts 02454
Pouget and Sejnowski, 1997) to invariant object recogni-
tion (Salinas and Abbott, 1997).
Gain modulation is not equivalent to the enhancementSummary
or suppression of neuronal responses by pure excitation
or inhibition. To illustrate the distinction, consider theGain modulation is a prominent feature of neuronal
firing rate of a neuron in response to injected currentactivity recorded in behaving animals, but the mecha-

  

Source: Abbott, Laurence - Center for Neurobiology and Behavior & Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University
Chance, Frances A. - Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine