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Journal of Insect Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 3, May 2005 ( C 2005) DOI: 10.1007/s10905-005-3692-4
 

Summary: Journal of Insect Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 3, May 2005 ( C 2005)
DOI: 10.1007/s10905-005-3692-4
The Effects of Copulatory Courtship
on Differential Allocation in the Red
Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum
Martin Edvardsson1,2
and G¨oran Arnqvist1
Accepted July 26, 2004; revised November 5, 2004
Mate attractiveness is known to sometimes influence female reproductive in-
vestment (i.e. differential allocation) and the sex ratio of her offspring (i.e. sex
allocation). Males of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum rub the lateral
edges of the females' elytra with their tarsi during copulation. This behavior
is important for paternity success when females have mated with two males.
We manipulated female perception of the leg rubbing behavior by tarsal ab-
lation and tested whether this behavior is also favored through differential
allocation and whether it affects sex allocation. We found some support for
an increase in female oviposition rate in response to intensive leg rubbing but
failed to find any support for an effect on sex allocation. The overall sex ratio
of offspring was slightly male biased but females did not appear to regulate
the sex ratio of their offspring.

  

Source: Arnqvist, Göran - Department of Animal Ecology, Uppsala Universitet
Jennions, Michael - School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology