Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Context and Spoken Word Recognition in a Novel Lexicon Kathleen Pirog Revill, Michael K. Tanenhaus, and Richard N. Aslin
 

Summary: Context and Spoken Word Recognition in a Novel Lexicon
Kathleen Pirog Revill, Michael K. Tanenhaus, and Richard N. Aslin
University of Rochester
Three eye movement studies with novel lexicons investigated the role of semantic context in spoken word
recognition, contrasting 3 models: restrictive access, access­selection, and continuous integration.
Actions directed at novel shapes caused changes in motion (e.g., looming, spinning) or state (e.g., color,
texture). Across the experiments, novel names for the actions and the shapes varied in frequency, cohort
density, and whether the cohorts referred to actions (Experiment 1) or shapes with action-congruent or
action-incongruent affordances (Experiments 2 and 3). Experiment 1 demonstrated effects of frequency
and cohort competition from both displayed and non-displayed competitors. In Experiment 2, a biasing
context induced an increase in anticipatory eye movements to congruent referents and reduced the
probability of looks to incongruent cohorts, without the delay predicted by access­selection models. In
Experiment 3, context did not reduce competition from non-displayed incompatible neighbors as
predicted by restrictive access models. The authors conclude that the results are most consistent with
continuous integration models.
Keywords: spoken word recognition, artificial lexicons, context integration
A long-standing issue in spoken word recognition is how syn-
tactic and semantic information from the prior context constrains
the activation of lexical candidates and the eventual decision that
a portion of fluent speech is a particular word. The effects of

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine