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PUBLICATIONS OF THE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF THE PACIFIC, 111:765771, 1999 June 1999. Astronomical Society of the Pacic. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
 

Summary: PUBLICATIONS OF THE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF THE PACIFIC, 111:765»771, 1999 June
1999. Astronomical Society of the Paci–c. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
Infrared Sky Brightness Monitors for Antarctica
J. W. V. STOREY, M. C. B. ASHLEY, M. BOCCAS,1 M. A. PHILLIPS, AND A. E. T. SCHINCKEL2
Joint Australian Centre for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (JACARA), School of Physics, University of NSW, Sydney 2052, Australia;
j.storey=unsw.edu.au
Received 1998 November 19; accepted 1999 March 8
ABSTRACT. Two sky brightness monitors»one for the near-infrared and one for the mid-infrared»have
been developed for site survey work in Antarctica. The instruments, which we refer to as the NISM
(Near-Infrared Sky Monitor) and the MISM (Mid-Infrared Sky Monitor), are part of a suite of instruments
being deployed in the Automated Astrophysical Site-Testing Observatory (AASTO). The chief design con-
straints include reliable, autonomous operation, low power consumption, and of course the ability to
operate under conditions of extreme cold. The instruments are currently operational at the Amundsen-Scott
South Pole Station, prior to deployment at remote, unattended sites on the high antarctic plateau.
1. INTRODUCTION
The antarctic plateau is recognized as having the poten-
tial to provide some of the best astronomical observing
conditions on earth (see, e.g., Burton et al. 1994). Almost all
the site testing to date has been carried out at the South
Pole, where it has already been demonstrated that condi-

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics