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MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE
 

Summary: MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT
WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE
VINEY P. ANEJA1, BRAHM P. MALIK1, QUANSONG TONG1, DAIWEN KANG1
and JOHN H. OVERTON2
1 Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-8208, U.S.A.; 2 1911 Fountain Ridge Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, U.S.A.
( author for correspondence, e-mail: viney_aneja@ncsu.edu; fax: 019195157802)
(Received 7 July 2000; accepted 31 January 2001)
Abstract. Global emissions of ammonia are approximately 75 Tg N/yr (1 Tg = 1012g). The major
global source is excreta from domestic animals ( 32 Tg N -1yr-1). Waste storage and treatment
lagoons are used to treat the excreta of hogs in North Carolina (NC). Proteins and nitrogen rich
compounds in the lagoon are converted to ammonia, through a series of biological and chemical
transformations. The process of ammonia emission has been investigated using two different model
approaches: (1) Coupled Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction Model (Model I), and (2) Mass
Transport without Chemical Reaction Model (Model II). A sensitivity analysis is performed with the
models, and the model results are compared with ammonia emission experiments at a swine waste
storage and treatment lagoon in NC using a dynamic emission flux chamber.
Results of model predictions of emission flux indicate an exponential increase in ammonia flux
with increasing lagoon temperature and pH, a linear increase with increasing lagoon total ammoni-
acal nitrogen (TAN), and a secondary degree increase with the increasing wind speed. In addition, the

  

Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences