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vol. 173, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2009 Costs of Changing Sex Do Not Explain Why Sequential
 

Summary: vol. 173, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2009
Costs of Changing Sex Do Not Explain Why Sequential
Hermaphroditism Is Rare
Erem Kazancioglu* and Suzanne H. Alonzo
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520
Submitted April 8, 2008; Accepted October 3, 2008; Electronically published January 27, 2009
abstract: Sex change is a relatively rare phenomenon among an-
imals. While classic theory has been successful in assessing the adap-
tive significance of sex change and predicting within-species patterns,
it does not explain why more animals are not sex changers. A possible
explanation for the rarity of sex change is that costs such as decreased
reproduction due to gonadal reconstruction favor separate sexes, or
dioecy. These costs, however, have not been studied empirically or
theoretically. Here, we investigate whether costs of changing sex can
favor dioecy. Our analyses suggest that dioecy is favored only when
costs of changing sex are large. Moreover, the fitness effect of costs
and the strength of male size advantage are not static but change
with the population composition, resulting in a dynamic evolutionary
game between sex change and dioecy. We conclude that costs of
changing sex alone are unlikely to explain the observed rarity of sex

  

Source: Alonzo, Suzanne H. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Biology and Medicine