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TREE vol. 15, no. 9 September 2000 0169-5347/00/$ see front matter 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. 357 JOURNAL CLUB
 

Summary: TREE vol. 15, no. 9 September 2000 0169-5347/00/$ see front matter 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. 357
JOURNAL CLUB
The question of whether sympatric speciation
(i.e. reproductive isolation of populations with
overlapping distributions) is a source of
biodiversity has always been controversial. So
far, mounting evidence from only a few
species, for example African lacustrine
cichlids, African widowbirds and
phytophagous insects, supports the notion
that it occurs in nature. In the latter two, host
shifts can lead to genetic isolation of the
population that has shifted.
A potential new example comes from
Eurasian and North American crossbills. The
North American red crossbill (Loxia
curvirostra) can be divided into sibling species
that differ in vocalizations, with positive
assortative mating between males and
females of the same vocal type. Moreover,

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology