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16 PlantFrugivore Interactions as Spatially Explicit Networks
 

Summary: 16 Plant­Frugivore Interactions
as Spatially Explicit Networks:
Integrating Frugivore Foraging
with Fruiting Plant Spatial
Patterns
T.A. CARLO , J.E. AUKEMA AND J.M. MORALES
Introduction
Dispersal is essential for the persistence of populations in space and time
(McArthur and Wilson, 1968; Levins, 1969). Theoretical and empirical
studies suggest that seed dispersal is one of the major mechanisms that
build and sustain diversity in plant communities (Nathan and Muller-
Landau, 2000; Webb and Peart, 2001; Condit et al., 2002). In many plant
communities, frugivorous animals are believed to play the major role in
structuring and maintaining diversity through their seed dispersal services
(Schupp et al., 2002; Terborgh et al., 2002). The relevance of frugivores is
implicit in the many adaptations for endozoochory (i.e. seed dispersal
through guts) in nearly all plant taxa (van der Pijl, 1972), as well as in the
high proportions of woody plant species that are dispersed by frugivores in
many plant communities (Herrera, 2003). Therefore, in order to
understand the ecology of many plant communities it is necessary to have a

  

Source: Aukema, Juliann E. - National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California at Santa Barbara
Carlo, Tomás A. - Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology