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THE GEOSTATIONARY EARTH RADIATION BUDGET (GERB) EXPERIMENT: SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS
 

Summary: THE GEOSTATIONARY EARTH RADIATION BUDGET (GERB)
EXPERIMENT: SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS
J E Russell, J E Harries, J Hanafin, H Brindley, J M Futyan
Space and Atmospheric Physics, Imperial College, London
R P Allan, A Slingo
Environmental Systems Science Centre, The University of Reading
M A Ringer
Met Office, Hadley Centre
ABSTRACT
When the first Meteosat Second Generation satellite (MSG-1) was launched in August 2002, it carried an
additional instrument, chosen through an Announcement of Opportunity. Named the Geostationary Earth
Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment, this instrument will measure the long and shortwave components of
the Earth's radiation budget for the first time from geostationary orbit. This vantage point permits much
higher time sampling than is possible from polar orbiting spacecraft, allowing a number of rapidly varying
climate processes (e.g. diurnal convection over Africa) to be resolved. GERB data, in combination with the
Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra Red Imager (SEVIRI) and earth radiation budget measurements from
polar orbiting instruments will provide a new understanding of the climate system and allow models to be
tested in new ways. This paper gives some background about the GERB instrument and data products,
presents some of the results from the instrument calibration commissioning and initial data validation phases
and provides an introduction to some of the studies that are planned for these unique data

  

Source: Allan, Richard P. - Department of Meteorology, University of Reading

 

Collections: Geosciences