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Copyright 2007 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. Abella, S. R., W. W. Covington, P. Z. Ful, L. B. Lentile, A. J. Snchez Meador, and P. Morgan. 2007.
 

Summary: Copyright © 2007 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance.
Abella, S. R., W. W. Covington, P. Z. Fulé, L. B. Lentile, A. J. Sánchez Meador, and P. Morgan. 2007.
Past, present, and future old growth in frequent-fire conifer forests of the western united states. Ecology and
Society 12(2): 16. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol12/iss2/art16/
Synthesis, part of a Special Feature on The Conservation and Restoration of Old Growth in Frequent-fire
Forests of the American West
Past, Present, and Future Old Growth in Frequent-fire Conifer Forests of
the Western United States
Scott R. Abella 1
, W. Wallace Covington 2,3
, Peter Z. Fulé 2,3
, Leigh B. Lentile 4
,
Andrew J. Sánchez Meador 5
, and Penelope Morgan 4
ABSTRACT. Old growth in the frequent-fire conifer forests of the western United States, such as those containing
ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), giant sequoia (Sequioa giganteum) and other species,
has undergone major changes since Euro-American settlement. Understanding past changes and anticipating future
changes under different potential management scenarios are fundamental to developing ecologically based fuel
reduction or ecological restoration treatments. Some of the many changes that have occurred in these forests include

  

Source: Abella, Scott R. - School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology