Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Molecular Ecology (2005) 14, 26452657 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02622.x 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
 

Summary: Molecular Ecology (2005) 14, 26452657 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02622.x
2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.
Population genetic structure in migratory sandhill cranes
and the role of Pleistocene glaciations
KENNETH L. JONES,* GARY L. KRAPU, DAVID A. BRANDT and MARY V. ASHLEY*
*University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biological Sciences (M/C 066), Chicago, Illinois 606077060, USGS, Northern
Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown, North Dakota 58401
Abstract
Previous studies of migratory sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) have made significant
progress explaining evolution of this group at the species scale, but have been unsuccessful
in explaining the geographically partitioned variation in morphology seen on the popula-
tion scale. The objectives of this study were to assess the population structure and gene
flow patterns among migratory sandhill cranes using microsatellite DNA genotypes and
mitochondrial DNA haplotypes of a large sample of individuals across three populations.
In particular, we were interested in evaluating the roles of Pleistocene glaciation events
and postglaciation gene flow in shaping the present-day population structure. Our results
indicate substantial gene flow across regions of the Midcontinental population that are geo-
graphically adjacent, suggesting that gene flow for most of the region follows an isolation-
by-distance model. Male-mediated gene flow and strong female philopatry may explain

  

Source: Ashley, Mary V. - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology