Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Occlusion and the Interpretation of Visual Motion: Perceptual and Neuronal Effects of Context
 

Summary: Occlusion and the Interpretation of Visual Motion: Perceptual and
Neuronal Effects of Context
Robert O. Duncan,1 Thomas D. Albright,1,2 and Gene R. Stoner1
1Systems Neurobiology Laboratories and 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La
Jolla, California 92037
Visual motion can be represented in terms of the dynamic visual
features in the retinal image or in terms of the moving surfaces in
the environment that give rise to these features. For natural
images, the two types of representation are necessarily quite
different because many moving features are only spuriously re-
lated to the motion of surfaces in the visual scene. Such "extrin-
sic" features arise at occlusion boundaries and may be detected
by virtue of the depth-ordering cues that exist at those bound-
aries. Although a number of studies have provided evidence of
the impact of depth ordering on the perception of visual motion,
few attempts have been made to identify the neuronal substrate
of this interaction. To address this issue, we devised a simple
contextual manipulation that decouples surface motion from the
motions of visual image features. By altering the depth ordering
between a moving pattern and abutting static regions, the per-

  

Source: Albright, Tom - Vision Center Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine