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Geographic structure in the searching behaviour of a specialist parasitoid: combining molecular and behavioural approaches
 

Summary: Geographic structure in the searching behaviour of a specialist
parasitoid: combining molecular and behavioural approaches
D. M. ALTHOFF* & J. N. THOMPSON
*Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA
Introduction
Studies of interspeci®c interactions in recent years have
demonstrated substantial geographic variation in the
relationships between pairs or groups of interacting
species. Populations may differ in how they adapt to
an interaction with another species (Kraaijeveld &
van Alphen, 1994; Burdon & Thompson, 1995; Joshi &
Thompson, 1996; Abrahamson & Weis, 1997), the set of
species involved in an interaction may differ geograph-
ically (e.g. Arnold, 1981; Davies & de L Brooke, 1989;
Carroll & Boyd, 1992; Benkman, 1993; Carroll et al.,
1997), and the outcome of the interaction may vary
among communities (Thompson & Pellmyr, 1992; Clay,
1996; Benkman, 1999). Depending on the rate of gene
Żow among populations within interacting species, traits

  

Source: Althoff, David M. - Department of Biology, Syracuse University
Thompson, John N. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology