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Africanized Honey Bees Keith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. Delaplane
 

Summary: Africanized Honey Bees
Keith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. DelaplaneKeith S. Delaplane
Professor of EntomologyProfessor of EntomologyProfessor of EntomologyProfessor of EntomologyProfessor of Entomology
Honey bees are among the most well-known
and economically important insects. They pro-
duce honey and beeswax, and pollinate many
crops. In Georgia, a large segment of the beekeep-
ing industry produces queens and package bees
for sale to other beekeepers. Although many
people make a living from bees, most beekeepers
are hobbyists with only a few hives.
Honey Bees in the New World
Honey bees are not native to the New World.
Most of them are descendants of bees brought to
North America and South America by European
settlers beginning in the 1600s. Bees from Europe
did well in North America, so most areas of the
United States today have managed and wild honey
bee colonies of European descent. European
honey bees were not as well adapted to tropical

  

Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia

 

Collections: Biotechnology