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To appear in "1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Lighthouses," a conference held June 2004 in Padua, Italy; to be published as an ASP Conference Proceedings.
 

Summary: To appear in "1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Lighthouses," a conference held June
2004 in Padua, Italy; to be published as an ASP Conference Proceedings.
Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The View at 400 Years
W. P. Blair
Department of Physics & Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University,
3400 N Charles St., Baltimore, MD, 21218 USA
Abstract. October 2004 marks the 400th anniversary of the sighting of
SN 1604, now marked by the presence of an expanding nebulosity known as
Kepler's supernova remnant. Of the small number of remnants of historical
supernovae, Kepler's remnant remains the most enigmatic. The supernova type,
and hence the type of star that exploded, is still a matter of debate, and even the
distance to the remnant is uncertain by more than a factor of two. As new and
improved multiwavength observations become available, and as the time baseline
of observations gets longer, Kepler's supernova remnant is slowly revealing its
secrets. I review recent and current observations of Kepler's supernova remnant
and what they indicate about this intriguing object.
1. Introduction
Four hundred years ago, when Johannes Kepler and others observed the "new
star" of 1604, those observing the event had no concept of what it was that
they were observing. Today we know that supernovae are exploding stars and

  

Source: Henry, Richard C.- Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University

 

Collections: Physics