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Vadose Zone Procests and Chemical Transport /Mobility of Soil Nitrogen and Microbial Responses following
 

Summary: Vadose Zone Procests and Chemical Transport
/Mobility of Soil Nitrogen and Microbial Responses following
the Sudden Death of Established Turf .-
Zhongchun Jiang, John T. Bushoven, Heather J. Ford, Carl D. Sawyers Jose A. Amador, and Richard J. Hull*
ABSTRACT
The stability of nitrogen within a turf-soil ecosystem is important
both for efficient turfmanagement and preventing the contaminiation
of ground water by nitrate.The objective of this study was to quantify
responses of the microbial conmiunnity andthe mobility of soil nitrogen
following the sudden death of established turf. Twelve-year-old turf
plots comprising four cool-season turfgrass species fertilized with five
N sources were maintained on an Enfield silt loam (coarse-silty over
sandy or sandy-skeletal, mixed, active, mesic Typic Dystrudept) at
Kingston. RI. Half of the plots were killed with glyphosate in early
September and any regrowth was removed mechanically. Measure-
ments of soil physical, chemical, and microbiological properties and
nitrate leaching in killed and healthy plots were compared for 12 mo.
Turfdeath did not alter soil moisture, temperature, pH, or extractable
ammonium. Nitrate levels were higher in both the root zone and at
60 cm following turfdeath and this difference persisted for the sam-

  

Source: Amador, Josť A. - Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island

 

Collections: Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies; Environmental Sciences and Ecology