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Direct Imaging of Exoplanets: Science & Techniques Proceedings IAU Colloquium No. 200, 2005
 

Summary: Direct Imaging of Exoplanets: Science & Techniques
Proceedings IAU Colloquium No. 200, 2005
C. Aime and F. Vakili, eds.
c 2006 International Astronomical Union
doi:10.1017/S1743921306009483
Exoplanet detection from Dome C,
Antarctica: opportunities and challenges
J. S. Lawrence, M. C. B. Ashley, M. G. Burton, and J. W. V. Storey
School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia
email: jl@phys.unsw.edu.au
Abstract. Many methods have been proposed for the detection of exoplanets. The minimum
detectable planetary size and mass, and the maximum distance from us at which exoplanets are
observable, are determined by both technological and environmental constraints. The unique
atmospheric conditions found at Dome C offer significant advantages. Using what is now known
about the turbulence profile of the atmosphere above Antarctic plateau sites, we explore the
potential these sites offer for detecting exoplanets around nearby stars using various methods.
Keywords. planetary systems, telescopes, instrumentation: adaptive optics, atmospheric ef-
fects, techniques: high angular resolution.
1. Introduction
The opening in 2005 of the French/Italian Concordia Station at Dome C opens new

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics