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Ecology, 83(12), 2002, pp. 34083415 2002 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 3408
Ecology, 83(12), 2002, pp. 34083415
2002 by the Ecological Society of America
HERBIVORY AND MATERNAL EFFECTS: MECHANISMS AND
CONSEQUENCES OF TRANSGENERATIONAL INDUCED
PLANT RESISTANCE
ANURAG A. AGRAWAL1
Department of Botany, 25 Willcocks Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2 Canada
Abstract. Many plants induce defenses against herbivores following initial attack. Ma-
ternal effects associated with herbivory could mediate induced defenses across generations
of plants if damaged plants produce more resistant progeny than undamaged plants. I report
that wild radish plants (Raphanus raphanistrum) damaged by herbivores (Pieris rapae) or
treated with a chemical elicitor of induced resistance (jasmonic acid) during the vegetative
growth stage, induced resistance of the plants' progeny compared to controls. Conversely,
clipping of leaves with scissors, which results in loss of photosynthetic area but not induced
resistance, tended to increase susceptibility of progeny plants to P. rapae compared to
controls. Progeny plants exhibited further induced resistance when damaged as seedlings,
although maternally induced plants were less inducible than maternal-control plants. Her-
bivory in the maternal generation also affected the growth of progeny plants in two ways:
(1) seed mass, which was influenced by maternal herbivory, strongly positively correlated

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology