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Journal of Tropical Ecology (1999) 15:229235. Copyright 1999 Cambridge University Press
 

Summary: Journal of Tropical Ecology (1999) 15:229­235.
Copyright © 1999 Cambridge University Press
SHORT COMMUNICATION
The fruits the agouti ate: Hymenaea courbaril
seed fate when its disperser is absent
NIGEL M. ASQUITH*, JOHN TERBORGH*, A. ELIZABETH ARNOLD
and C. MAILEŽN RIVEROS
* Department of Zoology, Box 90325, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-
0325, USA (nigel.asquith@duke.edu)
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ari-
zona 85721, USA
Instituto de ZoologiŽa Tropical, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela,
Apartado 47058, Caracas, 1041-A, Venezuela
(Accepted 26th September 1998)
KEY WORDS: agouti, Dasyprocta spp., Hymenaea courbaril, islands, seed dispersal,
seed predation, tropical dry forest, Venezuela
The neotropical canopy tree Hymenaea courbaril L. (Caesalpiniaceae) has long
been hypothesized to depend on mammals for the dispersal of its seeds.
Hallwachs (1986) suggested that agouti (Dasyprocta spp., Rodentia) inherited
the role of disperser of H. courbaril seeds from large Pleistocene mammals

  

Source: Arnold, A. Elizabeth - School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine