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Freiburg iGEM Team: Serial Gold Medal Winner FRIAS School of LIFENET Fellow Katja Arndt Triumphant at the MIT in Boston for Third
 

Summary: Freiburg iGEM Team: Serial Gold Medal Winner
FRIAS School of LIFENET Fellow Katja Arndt Triumphant at the MIT in Boston for Third
Time Running­ ,,Gene Cutter" Key to Success
The Freiburg Bioware Team, an important part of the Excellence Cluster bioss, has done it again: one
gold medal and two special prizes at the iGEM (international Genetically Engineered Machine)
competition, the largest event in the world for undergraduates in synthetic biology. FRIAS Junior Fellow
Katja Arndt together with Kristian Müller entered the competition with two teams this time, made it to
the finals, and demonstrated with the Bioware Team and the Software Team that they rank among the
top six talent shapers in the world for biotechnology research. They won the special prize for ,,Best
Poster" and ­ an achievement they are especially proud of ­ the special prize for the ,,Best New BioBrick
Engineered," i.e. the best genetic brick, the main scientific focus of iGEM.
Last year Freiburg placed second in the finals and won a gold medal with a system for switching
processes within cells on and off from outside. Three years ago Freiburg became the first German team
ever to participate in the yearly competition at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in
Boston. The current Bioware Team, 14 fifth to ninth semester undergraduates supervised by three
doctoral students, developed an innovative ,,gene cutter" which can simplify the process of separating
and binding genes. The concept convinced the jurors and the team distinguished itself in the company of
1100 students in 112 teams from the best universities in the world.
The promising new field synthetic biology has the goal of assembling genetic building blocks, i.e. DNA
molecules, first into simple patterns and then into increasingly complex structures. For the iGEM

  

Source: Arndt, Katja - Institut für Biologie III, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

 

Collections: Biotechnology; Biology and Medicine