Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
NANOSTRUCTURED CERAMICS THROUGH SELF-ASSEMBLY Ilhan A. Aksay
 

Summary: NANOSTRUCTURED CERAMICS THROUGH SELF-ASSEMBLY
Ilhan A. Aksay
Department of Chemical Engineering and
Princeton Materials Institute
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-5263
Opportunity
The length scales defining structure and organization determine the fundamental characteristics
of a material. Traditional ceramic materials exhibit organization on two length scales: the atomic
scale, e.g., the unit cell of the crystal or the local arrangement of amorphous materials, and the
scale of the grain size within the composite, typically much longer length and on the order of
micrometers or greater. In biogenic materials, however, we observe a much broader range of
organizational length scales: (1) a hierarchical organization always starts at the nanometer length
scale, in which case, nanostructural design is the building block of larger scale composite
structures; and (2) the nested levels of structural hierarchy appear to yield improved properties
for particular functions (Aksay et al. 1994; NAP 1994).
In biogenic systems, nanostructural design is accomplished through the self-assembly of
organics. Inorganic structures form via template-assisted self-assembly, where self-assembled
organic material (e.g., proteins and/or lipids) form the structural scaffolding for the deposition of
inorganic material (Sarikaya and Aksay 1994; Sarikaya and Aksay 1992). Organic materials are

  

Source: Aksay, Ilhan A. - Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University

 

Collections: Materials Science