2593 K
214 pp.
 
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TitleMapping Our Genes: The Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast
Publication DateApril 1988
Report NumberOTA-BA-373
Unique IdentifierACC0485
Other NumbersLegacy ID: TI88009778; OSTI ID: 5113312
Research OrgOffice of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, Washington, DC
Subject59 Basic Biological Sciences; 09 Biomass Fuels; 29 Energy Planning, Policy and Economy; DNA Sequencing; Coordinated Research Programs; Information Systems; International Cooperation; Genetic Mapping; National Program Plans; Organizational Models; Program Management; Advisory Committees; Ethical Aspects; European Communities; Experiment Planning; Federal Republic Of Germany; France; Italy; Japan; Man; Reviews; Technology Transfer; United Kingdom; US DOE; US HEW; US National Academy of Science; Animals; Asia; Cooperation; Europe; International Organizations; Mammals; Management; Mapping; National Organizations; Planning; Primates; Research Programs; Structural Chemical Analysis; US Organizations; Vertebrates; Western Europe; 550400* -- Genetics; 550200 -- Biochemistry; 140504 -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989); 299003 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Unconventional Sources & Power Generation-- Other-- (-1989); 299000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Unconventional Sources & Power Generation
Related Web PagesHuman Genome: DOE Origins
AbstractFor the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for “writing the rules” of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world.
2593 K
214 pp.
 
View Document 
  


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