13169 K
151 pp.
 
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TitleDepartment of Energy 1977--1994: A Summary History
Author(s)Fehner, T. R.; Holl, J. M.
Publication DateNovember 1994
Report NumberDOE/HR--0098
Unique IdentifierACC0062
Other NumbersLegacy ID: TI95004808; OSTI ID: 10106088
Research OrgUSDOE Office of Administration and Human Resource Management, Washington, DC (United States). History Div.
Sponsoring OrgUS Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States)
Subject99 General and Miscellaneous//Mathematics, Computing, and Information Science
KeywordsUS DOE; Historical Aspects; Research Programs; Energy Policy; Environmental Policy; Foreign Policy
AbstractThe Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 created perhaps the most interesting and diverse agency in the Federal Government. The new department brought together for the first time not only most of the government`s energy programs but also defense responsibilities that included the design, construction, and testing of nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy incorporated a score of organizational entities from a dozen departments and agencies, each with its own history and traditions. Uniting these seemingly disparate entities and programs was a common commitment to performing first rate science and technology. The Department of Energy sought--and continues to seek--to be one of the Nation`s premier science and technology organizations. The Department of Energy, 1977--1994, is a summary history of the origins, goals, and achievements of the Department and selected major programs. Beginning with the various fuels policies on the energy side and the Manhattan project on the defense side, the study details how the Department was born of the energy crisis of the early and mid-1970s. The history then surveys the Department and its programs from the Carter through the Clinton administrations. As the energy crisis eased, the Department played a central role on issues as dissimilar as the Strategic Defense Initiative and the Superconducting Super Collider. With the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy further transformed itself, moving from the building of bombs to partial dismantlement of the nuclear weapons complex and to an increased emphasis on environmental activities and technology transfer efforts.
13169 K
151 pp.
 
View Document 
  


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