1829 K
38 pp.
 
View Document 
  
TitleThe New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)
Author(s)Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.
Publication DateApril 26, 1950
Report NumberUCRL-669; AECD-2880
Unique IdentifierACC0045
Other NumbersOSTI ID: 4421999
Research OrgRadiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)]
Contract NoW-7405-eng-48
Sponsoring OrgAtomic Energy Commission
SubjectPhysics; Actinides; Alpha Beams; Alpha Decay; Alpha Particles; Americium; Americium 239; Americium 241; Berkelium 243; Capture; Chemical Reactions; Cross Sections; Curium 243; Cyclotrons; Decay; Electric Potential; Electrons; Energy Levels; Gadolinium; Half-life; Helium; High Temperature; Ion Exchange; Ion Exchange Materials; Ions; Irradiation; Isotopes; Neutrons; Nuclear Reactions; Oxidation; Precipitation; Production; Qualitative Analysis; Resins; Separation Processes; Terbium; 73 Nuclear Physics and Radiation Physics; Alpha Particles; Emission; Americium; Berkelium 243; Detection; Chemical Properties; Electron Capture; Half-Life; Ion Exchange
Related Web PagesGlenn T. Seaborg
AbstractAn isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.
1829 K
38 pp.
 
View Document 
  


Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.