Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning

Resources with Additional Information


Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner
Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory

'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging.  Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders.  Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.  Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes.  In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'


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Resources with Additional Information

Additional information about Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and positron scanning  is available in DOE documents and on the Web.

Documents:

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Additional Web Pages:

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PET and Michael E. Phelps

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