Frequently Asked Questions

What does DOE R&D Accomplishments contain?
The DOE R&D Accomplishments contains:
– a database of specially selected Department of Energy (DOE) accomplishments reports;
pages that feature either a renown scientist and his/her research or an accomplishments topic;
– information about Nobel Laureates associated with DOE and predecessors
– information about Enrico Fermi Laureates who have received this prestigious Presidential Award
– unique, wide-ranging, and Interesting Insights into DOE and DOE researchers
– accomplishments snapshots, which are quick pictures, introductions or overviews of DOE accomplishments;
– research and development (R&D) nuggets, which is an adjunt area containing scientific information and/or links to educational resources and materials which are complementary to accomplishments; and
navigation options that include the Site Map, the A - Z Index, the Menu Synopsis, and the Featured Scientists/Topics pick list, which is at the top of the page.
What is the date range of the content?
The dates of the content on the Web site span many years --
– starting with historical content from the Manhattan Project era (beginning in the 1940's)
– through more recent accomplishments, such as recent Nobel Laureates.
What is an accomplishment?
An accomplishment is an outcome of past DOE research and development that has had significant economic impact, has improved people’s lives, or has been widely recognized as a remarkable advance in science and whose benefits are being realized now.

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What are the topics in DOE R&D Accomplishments?
Topics are wide-ranging and include subjects such as chemistry, physics, materials, environmental science, geology, engineering, mathematics, climatology, oceanography, and computer science. Featured topics are Nobel Laureates, their research, and other highlighted research results.
How often are reports added to the database?  and how frequently are feature pages added?
Both are usually added on a monthly to bimonthly basis.
How do I download a document?  how long will it take?  and how much will it cost?
To download a document, right-click on the icon and choose "Save Link As" or "Save Target As".  The length of time it will take depends upon the size of the document and the technical capabilities of your equipment.  For instance, a large document downloaded using a modem would take a long time while downloading the same document using a T-1 line would be much quicker.  Downloading a document is free of charge.
If I am interested in just a few pages, can I download only those pages of interest?
To download a specific page, use the "Search within this document" feature that is on the bibliographic citation page to identify the page(s) of interest.  After you open an individual page in Adobe, you can download it using the "File --> Save Page As" option.
How do I get database help with DOE R&D Accomplishments?
In addition to the FAQ page that you are currently looking at, there is a Database Help page containing additional information.  If you have questions or wish to make a comment, you can do so through the Contact Us form.

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What are the predecessors of DOE?
The predecessor agencies of DOE are:
– the Energy Research & Development Administration (ERDA, 1975),
– the Federal Energy Administration (FEA, 1974)
– the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC, 1946),
– the Manhattan Project (1942),
– the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD, 1941),
– the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC, 1940), and
– the Advisory Committee on Uranium (1939). More information about DOE and predecessors is on the About page.
How widespread is DOE's research efforts?
DOE is responsible for the management of an extensive National Laboratory System, which represents one of the most comprehensive research enterprises in the world. These laboratories perform research and development that is multidisciplinary in nature and for which there is a strong public and national purpose.  DOE sponsors research at universities located in 49 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia.  These efforts support tens of thousands of principal investigators, post-doctoral students, and graduate students who are tackling some of the most challenging scientific questions of our era.

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